NYC Subway Train Derails Just Days After Last Derailment

By Johnny Jan 10, 2024 #NYC #Subway #Train Derailment

Officials said a subway train with dozens of passengers onboard jumped a track in Brooklyn Wednesday afternoon — disrupting MTA service just days after the city’s last derailment.

No injuries were reported when the northbound F train slight derailed on an elevated section of the track between the West 8th and Neptune Avenue stations in Coney Island at around 12:25 p.m., authorities said. 

Thirty-seven people were removed from the train following the low-speed derailment – including 34 passengers and three crew members, according to the MTA and FDNY.

Investigators will specifically eye whether a “track issue” may have played a role in the derailment, Richard Davey, president of NYC Transit, told reporters. 

“The track needs to be straight in order for a train to run on top of it safely and without a slow-speed derailment as we had here,” Davey said.

The affected train is part of a “newer class” with “event recorders” installed, that will help officials determine the cause of the mishap, he added.

The derailment “severely disrupted” F train service, with no trains available between Kings Highway and Coney Island, the MTA posted on X.

Service between Kings Highway and Church Avenue was also “extremely limited.”

But trains are tentatively expected to run as normal by the Thursday morning rush, Davey said.

The affected train is part of a “newer class” with “event recorders” installed, that will help officials determine the cause of the mishap, he added.

The derailment “severely disrupted” F train service, with no trains available between Kings Highway and Coney Island, the MTA posted on X.

Service between Kings Highway and Church Avenue was also “extremely limited.”

But trains are tentatively expected to run as normal by the Thursday morning rush, Davey said.

The incident comes six days after two subway trains collided on the Upper West Side at a crossover just north of the 96th Street station – leaving 24 people with minor injuries, officials said.

There are no apparent links between the two incidents, according to the transit head.

“Look, we’ll get to the bottom of this,” Davey said. “I realize that we obviously had issues last week, as well and we’ll get to the bottom of whatever this is, but at this point, from the collision we had last week and the derailment today don’t seem like they’re connected at all.”

In response, Pat Warren, the MTA’s chief of safety and security, said he understands the feds’ decision – but described the incident as “rare.”

“We understand from the NTSB that their comprehensive approach is routine in responding to serious incidents wherever they happen,” Warren said. “For a subway system that schedules 2.7 million train trips a year, covering 345 million miles annually, this derailment was a rare occurrence that points to the safety and resilience of transit in New York.”

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